Author: The Academic

T. L. Li (李天祿)

I return to the South this week with a Vanderbilt student: Dr. T. L. Li (李天祿, pinyin Lǐ Tiānlù; courtesy name 福田, pinyin Fútián). Dr. Li was not only extremely involved in the international Methodist Church, but participated in political events and was savvy enough to navigate the changing political waters of China through the Communist takeover.

Continue reading “T. L. Li (李天祿)”

Advertisements

Miss Phoebe Stone (石非比)

My student for this week is Miss Phoebe Stone (石非比, pinyin Shí Fēibǐ), who was the younger sister of the famous Dr. Mary Stone, one of the first Western-trained female physicians in China, and one of the first Chinese women to study in the United States. Mary is a little bit outside of the time period of my research, but Phoebe fits right in, and I’m excited to share her story with you.

Continue reading “Miss Phoebe Stone (石非比)”

Miss Y. C. Liang (梁逸羣)

This week I’ll be profiling one of the female Indemnity Scholars: Miss Yat-Kwan Liang (pinyin Liáng Yìqún, Cantonese Jyutping Loeng4 Jat6kwan4). Beginning in 1914, the Boxer Indemnity Scholarship exams were opened to female students every other year. The number was limited; in 1914 only 10 scholarships were awarded to women. 1916 was the second year that female students were sent to the US to study, and Y. C. Liang was one of 10 women that earned a scholarship that year (Shen Bao, 1 Sept 1916, pg. 10).

Continue reading “Miss Y. C. Liang (梁逸羣)”

Y. F. Chen (程義法)

Back to another original 1909 Boxer Indemnity Scholar! This week’s student is Y. F. Chen (程義法, pinyin Chéng YìFǎ), with a courtesy name of 中右 (pinyin Zhōng Yòu). He was born in about 1890 in Shanghai and left for the US before his 19th birthday to study mining and metallurgy.

Continue reading “Y. F. Chen (程義法)”

Y. B. Lieng (連弊)

Today’s student is Ye Beh Lieng (連弊, pinyin Lián Bì), a student with a story that is sadly common not just to the Boxer Indemnity international students of my research, but also to university students throughout history. You see, Y. B. Lieng began his university studies and got almost the whole way through, but had to stop for personal reasons, and never returned.

Continue reading “Y. B. Lieng (連弊)”

Z. C. Hsu (徐仁錆)

I have another great student this week, with name changes, political intrigue, lying, and terrible teaching ability! This post has it all, and the best (?) part is that many of my sources can’t be verified because they are all incredibly biased! This week I bring you the story of Zun Chan Hsu (徐仁錆, pinyin Xú Rénqiāng), who also went by the names 徐子明(Xú Zimíng) and 徐光 (pinyin Xú Guāng).

Continue reading “Z. C. Hsu (徐仁錆)”

Updates!

I recently got access to a new research database: Shen Bao (申報). This was a newspaper published in Shanghai in the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. It’s a Chinese-language source, which means I can search it for the Chinese names I have and get a bit more information about my students. I thought I’d go back and do a bit of updating of my previous posts with the information I’ve gleaned from Shen Bao.

Continue reading “Updates!”

L. Chee (劉伯枝)

Lately, I’ve been tinkering around with my data for a possible paper on the Indemnity Scholars who chose to go to schools in the US South. There are comparatively few of them, so I’m able to really get into each student’s story like I do here in the blog. So I thought I’d profile one such southern student: Leo Chee (劉伯枝, pinyin Liú Bóqí).

Continue reading “L. Chee (劉伯枝)”

Miss Antoinette Yut Yan Soo Hoo (司徒月蘭 )

Let’s return to the Soo Hoo family for a bit! So far in this blog I have profiled Nam Art Soo Hoo, the patriarch of the Soo Hoo clan, his oldest son Peter, his oldest daughter Clara, his son Andrew, his daughter Lily, and his two children who died young, Pauline and Lincoln. Impressively, this represents only half of his 11 children, with 5 more children with distinguished careers left to profile. So today we will continue with the family by profiling Miss Antoinette Yut Yan Soo Hoo (司徒月蘭, pinyin Sītú Yuèlán, Cantonese Jyutping Si1tou4 Jyut6laan4).

Continue reading “Miss Antoinette Yut Yan Soo Hoo (司徒月蘭 )”

P. C. Chan (陳伯賜)

This week’s profiled student is P. C. Chan, or Chan Pak Chue (陳伯賜, pinyin Chén Bócì, Jyutping Cantonese Can4 Baak3ci3). Born in 1895, P. C. Chan became an influential doctor and Christian both in the United States and China.

Continue reading “P. C. Chan (陳伯賜)”