Tag: 1912 Directory

Peter Soo Hoo (司徒彼得)

Back to our regularly-scheduled birth order for the Soo Hoo family. So, Nam Art Soo Hoo had 11 children, and the oldest child and son was Peter Soo Hoo. Annoyingly, there is another Peter Soo Hoo who was roughly a contemporary to our current subject, and they both even had the same career! This made the research for this post even harder than it really needed to be.

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H. J. Fei (費興仁)

Building off of my post on his wife, Elizabeth Cornish, today I’ll write a little more in depth about Hsing Jen Fei (費興仁, pinyin Fèi Xìngrén). He was born on 15 November 1886 to father Chi Feng and his wife, surnamed Hsü. He was born in North Tung Chow (today Tongzhou, a district of Beijing) and attended North Tung Chow Union College, which was also known as the North China Union College of Tungchow, a missionary school in Peking (Beijing). When H. J. Fei was at N. C. U. College, it had about 50 students in the university department (American Board of Commissioners, 122), so it was not a large school as compared to the mission universities in Shanghai and Canton.

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Miss Lillian Chan (陳謙信)

I was skimming through my unpublished drafts today, and I noticed that although I finished my postings on the Chan family over two months ago, I never posted about the middle daughter: Lillian Chan. Oops. So here’s a short post about the final daughter of the Chan family who studied in American schools: Lily Chan.

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Z. S. Bien (卞夀孫) and F. S. Bien (卞福孫)

Z. S. Bien (卞夀孫, pinyin Biàn Shòusūn) and his brother F. S. Bien (卞福孫, pinyin Biàn Fúsūn) were born to a well-known and politically-connected family in Yangzhou, Jiangsu province. Z. S. Bien was the older brother – he was born on 13 September 1884 – while the younger brother F. S. Bien was born on 11 June 1886. In fact, Z. S. Bien was the oldest of six children.

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H. K. Chow (周厚坤)

Despite the title of this blog, the Boxer Indemnity Scholars, this is the first entry to date which will be dealing with an actual student with a scholarship from the Boxer Indemnity Fund. Hou Kun Chow (周厚坤, pinyin Zhōu Hòukūn) was born on 27 September 1891 in Wusi, Jiangsu province. He was a student at Nanyang College in Shanghai, the current Jiao Tong University (Who’s Who of American Returned Students, 1917). He arrived in America on 11 September 1910 on board the steamship China, headed for Boston with the second group of Boxer Indemnity Scholars (ship’s manifest, link to Ancestry.com copy; Chow Hou-Kun, 2015).

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Miss Ida Chan (陳永信)

Here is post two of two about the Chan family for today: Ida Chan (陳永信, pinyin Chen Yongxin). This second-youngest daughter was born in Canada on 30 May 1893. She and her family lived in British Columbia until 1901, when they immigrated to Portland, Oregon.

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Miss Frances I. Chan (陳寬信)

I’m finishing up my posts on the Chan family this week, and I decided to post both Fanny’s and Ida’s posts today. These two youngest siblings were extremely difficult to trace; one of them died young and the other never became a US citizen, so there is comparatively little information about them. For that reason I’ve decided to post both biographies today, since the posts are shorter than my typical.

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Miss Bertie G. Chan (陳端信) and G. G. Leong (梁官照)

Bertha Grace Chan (Chinese name 陳端信, pinyin Chén Duānxìn) was born in September of 1887 in China, possibly in Canton (Guangzhou), but more likely in Hong Kong, as she was considered a British citizen. Her father was a Methodist missionary and her mother was a physician. When she was less than a year old, her family moved to Vancouver for her father’s missionary work. They lived in Canada for 12 years before moving to the United States.

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Chinese Student Directories

In my last post, I mentioned a few primary sources that I want to discuss in a little more detail, to give you an idea of how I track the movements of these Chinese students in America. The foremost primary source that I use for addresses and locations is the Chinese Students’ Alliance’s set of Chinese student directories. These seven directories, especially the ones that include the students’ Chinese names in characters, have proven to be the best way to keep up with the Boxer Indemnity Scholars. It’s hard to get a hold of these directories, and a couple of issues have disappeared into history. Schools that hosted a large number of Indemnity Scholars are always a good source for these directories; the University of Michigan seems to have a fairly full set, as do the University of Illinois and Columbia University in New York.

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