Tag: 1914 Directory

Pauline Soo-Hoo (司徒月桂) and Lincoln Soo-Hoo

While most of Nam Art Soo-Hoo‘s 11 children were wildly successful and prosperous in their adult lives, there were a few exceptions. I’ve posted about Andrew Soo-Hoo, the son who accidentally killed his father during an argument/fight, and never seemed to recover from that horror. But two others of the Soo-hoo family never realized their full adult potential: second-oldest daughter Pauline Soo-Hoo and third-oldest son Lincoln Soo-Hoo, because they both died before their respective 30th birthdays.

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Andrew Soo Hoo (司徒歡得)

Happy fall semester, everyone! Back to school and back to studying. And that means back to my profiles of the Soo Hoo family! I last left you with the father, Nam Art Soo Hoo, who was not a student himself, but the father of several students in the American university system. Usually when I profile several family members, I start with the parents and then proceed with the children in birth order. It is usually easiest and also gives the sense of progressing in linear order when you put the posts together. But for the Soo Hoo family, instead of proceeding on to oldest son Peter Soo Hoo from his father Nam Art Soo Hoo, I’m going to jump to the fifth child and second son of Nam Art, Andrew Soo Hoo, because he is an integral part of the end of his father’s story.

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H. J. Fei (費興仁)

Building off of my post on his wife, Elizabeth Cornish, today I’ll write a little more in depth about Hsing Jen Fei (費興仁, pinyin Fèi Xìngrén). He was born on 15 November 1886 to father Chi Feng and his wife, surnamed Hsü. He was born in North Tung Chow (today Tongzhou, a district of Beijing) and attended North Tung Chow Union College, which was also known as the North China Union College of Tungchow, a missionary school in Peking (Beijing). When H. J. Fei was at N. C. U. College, it had about 50 students in the university department (American Board of Commissioners, 122), so it was not a large school as compared to the mission universities in Shanghai and Canton.

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Miss Lillian Chan (陳謙信)

I was skimming through my unpublished drafts today, and I noticed that although I finished my postings on the Chan family over two months ago, I never posted about the middle daughter: Lillian Chan. Oops. So here’s a short post about the final daughter of the Chan family who studied in American schools: Lily Chan.

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H. K. Chow (周厚坤)

Despite the title of this blog, the Boxer Indemnity Scholars, this is the first entry to date which will be dealing with an actual student with a scholarship from the Boxer Indemnity Fund. Hou Kun Chow (周厚坤, pinyin Zhōu Hòukūn) was born on 27 September 1891 in Wusi, Jiangsu province. He was a student at Nanyang College in Shanghai, the current Jiao Tong University (Who’s Who of American Returned Students, 1917). He arrived in America on 11 September 1910 on board the steamship China, headed for Boston with the second group of Boxer Indemnity Scholars (ship’s manifest, link to Ancestry.com copy; Chow Hou-Kun, 2015).

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Miss Ida Chan (陳永信)

Here is post two of two about the Chan family for today: Ida Chan (陳永信, pinyin Chen Yongxin). This second-youngest daughter was born in Canada on 30 May 1893. She and her family lived in British Columbia until 1901, when they immigrated to Portland, Oregon.

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Miss Frances I. Chan (陳寬信)

I’m finishing up my posts on the Chan family this week, and I decided to post both Fanny’s and Ida’s posts today. These two youngest siblings were extremely difficult to trace; one of them died young and the other never became a US citizen, so there is comparatively little information about them. For that reason I’ve decided to post both biographies today, since the posts are shorter than my typical.

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H. T. Wong (黄顯庭)

A lot of Indemnity Scholars show up here and there across the pages of history without leaving many clues as to why they were there. 黄顯庭 is not like this. Hinting Wong (Jyutping [Cantonese] romanization Wong4 Hin2ting4) was born 2 November 1892 in Hong Kong to a Christian (Episcopalian) father, who may have attended Oxford (Syracuse Herald, 16 Nov 1917, link goes to Ancestry.com copy). H. T Wong attended both Canton Christian College in Guangzhou and Queen’s College in Hong Kong before serving in the Southern Army in 1911 (State College News, 1 Nov 1916). He was only 19 years old, but he was a 2nd lieutenant, Infantry – I expect his schooling sent him straight to the officer corps. He was wounded in battle, and his World War I draft card states he had lost his sight in his right eye. The previously cited Syracuse Herald story – “Veteran, Student Here” – retells the gripping story of how H. T. Wong received a bayonet thrust to the head in the 1911 Revolution (Syracuse Herald, 16 Nov 1917).

After his injury, H. T. Wong served as a secretary to several important figures in the Southern government. He was then sent abroad to study in Western universities. A New York newspaper article mentions him studying at Japanese and English universities, as well as at Harvard, but I can’t find any primary source documentation for this. No US arrival documentation as of yet.

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W. K. Lam (林雲陔)

The scope of this project is so enormous that sometimes I can only proceed in what feels like a very small spiraling motion outward. There are so many students and so many primary source documents, as well as the entire weight of Chinese and US History, that I sometimes feel like I am looking into an immense and densely populated forest, with no idea where the best point of entry is. Often it is just easier to pick a place to start, and then research the other people and places that relate to that starting point, until I am finally deep in the research. So: my previous student post was on E. J. Chu, and this post will be on the fellow student he boarded with in Albany: W. K. Lam.

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Chinese Student Directories

In my last post, I mentioned a few primary sources that I want to discuss in a little more detail, to give you an idea of how I track the movements of these Chinese students in America. The foremost primary source that I use for addresses and locations is the Chinese Students’ Alliance’s set of Chinese student directories. These seven directories, especially the ones that include the students’ Chinese names in characters, have proven to be the best way to keep up with the Boxer Indemnity Scholars. It’s hard to get a hold of these directories, and a couple of issues have disappeared into history. Schools that hosted a large number of Indemnity Scholars are always a good source for these directories; the University of Michigan seems to have a fairly full set, as do the University of Illinois and Columbia University in New York.

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