Tag: 1914 Directory

Y. F. Chen (程義法)

Back to another original 1909 Boxer Indemnity Scholar! This week’s student is Y. F. Chen (程義法, pinyin Chéng YìFǎ), with a courtesy name of 中右 (pinyin Zhōng Yòu). He was born in about 1890 in Shanghai and left for the US before his 19th birthday to study mining and metallurgy.

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Y. B. Lieng (連弊)

Today’s student is Ye Beh Lieng (連弊, pinyin Lián Bì), a student with a story that is sadly common not just to the Boxer Indemnity international students of my research, but also to university students throughout history. You see, Y. B. Lieng began his university studies and got almost the whole way through, but had to stop for personal reasons, and never returned.

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Z. C. Hsu (徐仁錆)

I have another great student this week, with name changes, political intrigue, lying, and terrible teaching ability! This post has it all, and the best (?) part is that many of my sources can’t be verified because they are all incredibly biased! This week I bring you the story of Zun Chan Hsu (徐仁錆, pinyin Xú Rénqiāng), who also went by the names 徐子明(Xú Zimíng) and 徐光 (pinyin Xú Guāng).

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L. Chee (劉伯枝)

Lately, I’ve been tinkering around with my data for a possible paper on the Indemnity Scholars who chose to go to schools in the US South. There are comparatively few of them, so I’m able to really get into each student’s story like I do here in the blog. So I thought I’d profile one such southern student: Leo Chee (劉伯枝, pinyin Liú Bóqí).

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Pauline Soo-Hoo (司徒月桂) and Lincoln Soo-Hoo

While most of Nam Art Soo-Hoo‘s 11 children were wildly successful and prosperous in their adult lives, there were a few exceptions. I’ve posted about Andrew Soo-Hoo, the son who accidentally killed his father during an argument/fight, and never seemed to recover from that horror. But two others of the Soo-hoo family never realized their full adult potential: second-oldest daughter Pauline Soo-Hoo and third-oldest son Lincoln Soo-Hoo, because they both died before their respective 30th birthdays.

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Andrew Soo Hoo (司徒歡得)

Happy fall semester, everyone! Back to school and back to studying. And that means back to my profiles of the Soo Hoo family! I last left you with the father, Nam Art Soo Hoo, who was not a student himself, but the father of several students in the American university system. Usually when I profile several family members, I start with the parents and then proceed with the children in birth order. It is usually easiest and also gives the sense of progressing in linear order when you put the posts together. But for the Soo Hoo family, instead of proceeding on to oldest son Peter Soo Hoo from his father Nam Art Soo Hoo, I’m going to jump to the fifth child and second son of Nam Art, Andrew Soo Hoo, because he is an integral part of the end of his father’s story.

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H. J. Fei (費興仁)

Building off of my post on his wife, Elizabeth Cornish, today I’ll write a little more in depth about Hsing Jen Fei (費興仁, pinyin Fèi Xìngrén). He was born on 15 November 1886 to father Chi Feng and his wife, surnamed Hsü. He was born in North Tung Chow (today Tongzhou, a district of Beijing) and attended North Tung Chow Union College, which was also known as the North China Union College of Tungchow, a missionary school in Peking (Beijing). When H. J. Fei was at N. C. U. College, it had about 50 students in the university department (American Board of Commissioners, 122), so it was not a large school as compared to the mission universities in Shanghai and Canton.

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Miss Lillian Chan (陳謙信)

I was skimming through my unpublished drafts today, and I noticed that although I finished my postings on the Chan family over two months ago, I never posted about the middle daughter: Lillian Chan. Oops. So here’s a short post about the final daughter of the Chan family who studied in American schools: Lily Chan.

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H. K. Chow (周厚坤)

Despite the title of this blog, the Boxer Indemnity Scholars, this is the first entry to date which will be dealing with an actual student with a scholarship from the Boxer Indemnity Fund. Hou Kun Chow (周厚坤, pinyin Zhōu Hòukūn) was born on 27 September 1891 in Wusi, Jiangsu province. He was a student at Nanyang College in Shanghai, the current Jiao Tong University (Who’s Who of American Returned Students, 1917). He arrived in America on 11 September 1910 on board the steamship China, headed for Boston with the second group of Boxer Indemnity Scholars (ship’s manifest, link to Ancestry.com copy; Chow Hou-Kun, 2015).

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Miss Ida Chan (陳永信)

Here is post two of two about the Chan family for today: Ida Chan (陳永信, pinyin Chen Yongxin). This second-youngest daughter was born in Canada on 30 May 1893. She and her family lived in British Columbia until 1901, when they immigrated to Portland, Oregon.

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