Tag: Columbia University

Y. L. Chin (金岳霖)

Today I cover another Boxer Indemnity Scholar, and indeed another famous Chinese scholar in general: Yueh Lin Chin (金岳霖, pinyin Jīn YuèLín), who attended Tsing Hua University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Columbia University, and was one of the principal founders of the study of Western logic in China. He is still famous in China today, not only for his books on philosophy, which are still read in schools, but for his interesting personal life.

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T. F. Tsiang (蔣廷黻)

I have a famous person to profile today! T. F. Tsiang (蔣廷黻, pinyin Jiǎng Tíngfú) was not only a student during the time of the Boxer Indemnity Scholarship program, but he went on to serve the Republic of China’s government and was a delegate to the United Nations. This means that there is a ton of information and newspaper articles available about him, his life, and his work, unlike many of my other Indemnity Scholars. To keep this from being an entire novel, and to avoid retreading the same ground that others have already examined thoroughly, in this post I will concentrate on T. F. Tsiang’s university life and studies, as well as his personal life.

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C. Y. Wang (王寵佑)

Kicking it old-school again today! I have a government-funded student to profile today who came to the US 8 years before the Boxer Indemnity Scholarship was founded. In fact, he entered the United States not long after the Boxer Rebellion itself ended! Today’s student is C. Y. Wang (王寵佑, pinyin Wáng ChǒngYòu; courtesy name 佐臣, pinyin Zuǒ Chén) who was one of the first Chinese students to attend the University of California.

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Miss Y. C. Liang (梁逸羣)

This week I’ll be profiling one of the female Indemnity Scholars: Miss Yat-Kwan Liang (pinyin Liáng Yìqún, Cantonese Jyutping Loeng4 Jat6kwan4). Beginning in 1914, the Boxer Indemnity Scholarship exams were opened to female students every other year. The number was limited; in 1914 only 10 scholarships were awarded to women. 1916 was the second year that female students were sent to the US to study, and Y. C. Liang was one of 10 women that earned a scholarship that year (Shen Bao, 1 Sept 1916, pg. 10).

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D. G. Tewksbury

You read that title correctly – today I will be profiling Donald George Tewksbury, who was born in Tung Chow (Tongzhou, a district of Beijing), China on 9 April 1894. I found his name in the 1919 Directory of the Chinese Students’ Christian Journal, and at first I thought this may have been an Elizabeth Cornish situation, where this Chinese student had a Western father and a Chinese mother. But D. G. Tewksbury was actually born to two American missionaries, and his story has so much to do with the Boxer Rebellion I thought it would be interesting to profile him here. I do feel a little weird profiling a Westerner here in this blog dedicated to Chinese voices, and I’ll go into that at the end of this post. Hopefully there’s enough of use in D. G. Tewksbury’s life story to make the profile worthwhile.

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C. H. Chu (朱兆莘)

Sometimes I choose a student to profile simply because I run across some really interesting information about them while I am elbow-deep in a box of old records. This is the case for C. H. Chu, whose alumni card I found a few weeks ago in the Columbia University Archives. He’s not connected to any other student I’ve profiled to this date, but he sure has a heck of a story.

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William Zu Liang Sung (沈嗣良)

Returning tangentially to the Soo Hoo family, I thought I’d dedicate a blog post to Lily Soo Hoo’s husband: William Z. L. Sung (沈嗣良, pinyin Shěn SìLiáng, Cantonese Jyutping Cam4/Sam2 Zi6Loeng4), a Chinese student who studied at Oberlin and Columbia and worked for St. John’s University in Shanghai. Continue reading “William Zu Liang Sung (沈嗣良)”

Miss C. H. Huang (黄振華)

Continuing on from last week’s post on Y. O. Huang, I thought I’d do a post on the sister that traveled with him, his wife, and E. J. Chu to America on the ocean liner Siberia in 1912. This is the 17-year-old C. H. Huang, or 黄振華 (pinyin Huáng ZhènHuá), born 15 November 1895 in Changsha, the oldest daughter of General Huang Xing and his first wife.

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Y. O. Huang (黄一歐)

As seems de rigueur with blogs, I have to apologize again for my extremely lengthy absence. Life, work, and my doctorate classes have gotten in the way for over a year, it seems. However, my New Year’s Resolution is to post more in this blog, so away I go! Starting absolutely from nowhere, I have decided to jump to the story of Y. O. Huang. I promise I will pick up the stories of the SooHoo family and William Z. L. Sung again very very soon (I promise! I even have a list!).

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H. T. Wong (黄顯庭)

A lot of Indemnity Scholars show up here and there across the pages of history without leaving many clues as to why they were there. 黄顯庭 is not like this. Hinting Wong (Jyutping [Cantonese] romanization Wong4 Hin2ting4) was born 2 November 1892 in Hong Kong to a Christian (Episcopalian) father, who may have attended Oxford (Syracuse Herald, 16 Nov 1917, link goes to Ancestry.com copy). H. T Wong attended both Canton Christian College in Guangzhou and Queen’s College in Hong Kong before serving in the Southern Army in 1911 (State College News, 1 Nov 1916). He was only 19 years old, but he was a 2nd lieutenant, Infantry – I expect his schooling sent him straight to the officer corps. He was wounded in battle, and his World War I draft card states he had lost his sight in his right eye. The previously cited Syracuse Herald story – “Veteran, Student Here” – retells the gripping story of how H. T. Wong received a bayonet thrust to the head in the 1911 Revolution (Syracuse Herald, 16 Nov 1917).

After his injury, H. T. Wong served as a secretary to several important figures in the Southern government. He was then sent abroad to study in Western universities. A New York newspaper article mentions him studying at Japanese and English universities, as well as at Harvard, but I can’t find any primary source documentation for this. No US arrival documentation as of yet.

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